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LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 89

Comment on An unusual presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease-9


Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Medical Sciences and SUM Hospital, SOA (Deemed to be) University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Date of Submission25-May-2021
Date of Decision03-Jun-2021
Date of Acceptance10-Jun-2021
Date of Web Publication18-Jul-2022

Correspondence Address:
Pradeep Kumar Panigrahi
Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Medical Sciences and SUM Hospital, SOA (Deemed to be) University, 8-Kalinga Nagar, Bhubaneswar - 751 003, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcor.jcor_78_21

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How to cite this article:
Panigrahi PK. Comment on An unusual presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease-9. J Clin Ophthalmol Res 2022;10:89

How to cite this URL:
Panigrahi PK. Comment on An unusual presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease-9. J Clin Ophthalmol Res [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 19];10:89. Available from: https://www.jcor.in/text.asp?2022/10/2/89/351300



Dear Editor,

With great interest, I went through the article “An unusual presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) Disease” by Keerthhi Dhevi et al.[1] The authors have nicely described an unusual association of subhyaloid hemorrhage with VKH disease. Valsalva retinopathy appears to the most probable cause of the preretinal hemorrhage as mentioned by the authors. The association seems to be coincidental. The association of preretinal hemorrhage with VKH disease is very rare. There are few reports of proliferative retinopathy in cases with VKH disease presenting with preretinal hemorrhage.[2],[3],[4] The cause of hemorrhage in such cases is due to the development of retinal neovascularization and is usually seen in chronic recurrent cases of VKH disease. Suboptimal control of inflammation has been postulated to be the cause of retinal neovascularization.[4] Management modalities include adequate control of ocular inflammation with oral steroids and immunosuppressives, laser photocoagulation, antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, and pars plana vitrectomy. VKH disease has a high propensity for recurrence. The authors have managed the present episode with systemic steroids only. Long follow-up will be needed, and if any recurrences develop in the future, combination of systemic steroids with other immunosuppressive agents might be essential. Adequate control of ocular inflammation can help in preventing a rare but possible complication of proliferative retinopathy in VKH disease.

Financial support and sponsorship

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Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Keerthhi Dhevi RS, Geetha G, Shanker MP, Anusha V. An unusual presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. J Clin Ophthalmol Res 2021;9:27-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
To KW, Nadel AJ, Brockhurst RJ. Optic disc neovascularization in association with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol 1990;108:918-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kanter PJ, Goldberg MF. Bilateral uveitis with exudative retinal detachment. Angiographic appearance. Arch Ophthalmol 1974;91:13-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Magliyah MS, Al-Fakhri AS, Al-Dhibi HA. Proliferative retinopathy as a feature of Vogt Koyanagi Harada Disease: A report of two cases. BMC Ophthalmol 2020;20:470.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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