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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 41-43

Chronic postoperative endophthalmitis with an unusual organism: Unconventional approach


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Command Hospital (NC), Chandimandir, Haryana, India
2 Department of Ophthalmology, INHS Dhanvantari, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India

Correspondence Address:
Kapil Gopal Shahare
Department of Ophthalmology, INHS Dhanvantari, Minnie Bay, Port Blair - 744 103, Andaman and Nicobar Islands
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcor.jcor_26_19

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Chronic postoperative endophthalmitis (CPE) following cataract surgery with the appearance of distinct plaques is most commonly caused by Propionibacterium acnes and the standard treatment is intraocular lens (IOL) explant and complete capsulectomy. We report a case of CPE who presented with an indolent recurrent course, manifested numerous typical plaques in the capsular bag, and was treated with an IOL explant, re-implant, and two-port 23G pars plana vitrectomy under direct vision with good results. The organism grown was Bacillus species which is the most common known cause of posttraumatic endophthalmitis and typically has a rapidly devastating course. It is very rare to detect Bacillus species as an incriminating organism in CPE.


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