Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research

BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 65--67

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus-related oculomotor palsy in a pediatric patient


Vimal Krishna Rajput1, Chaithra D Aroor2, Anupama Kiran Kumar3, Prathana Bhandary4,  
1 Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Narayana Nethralaya-3, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Cataract and Neuro-Ophthalmology, Narayana Nethralaya-3, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Retina, Narayana Nethralaya-3, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, Narayana Nethralaya-3, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Vimal Krishna Rajput
Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Narayana Nethralaya-3, 37 Castle Street, Ashok Nagar, Bengaluru - 560 025, Karnataka
India

Abstract

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a rare form of shingles that typically presents with prodromal symptoms followed by rash along the V1 or V2 dermatomes. Associated ophthalmoplegia is even rarer. About 99% of adults with a history of chickenpox and up to 90% of those without have serology positive for varicella-zoster. Age and immune incompetence are the main risk factors. In the current report, we describe an immunocompetent 16-year-old girl who presented with pupil invoinvolving complete third nerve palsy associated with HZO. After an extensive literature search, we could not find any similar case reported before.



How to cite this article:
Rajput VK, Aroor CD, Kumar AK, Bhandary P. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus-related oculomotor palsy in a pediatric patient.J Clin Ophthalmol Res 2020;8:65-67


How to cite this URL:
Rajput VK, Aroor CD, Kumar AK, Bhandary P. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus-related oculomotor palsy in a pediatric patient. J Clin Ophthalmol Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Aug 8 ];8:65-67
Available from: http://www.jcor.in/text.asp?2020/8/2/65/288842


Full Text



 Introduction



Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a rare form of shingles that typically presents with prodromal symptoms followed by rash along the V1 or V2 dermatomes. Associated ophthalmoplegia is even rarer. About 99% of adults with a history of chicken pox and up to 90% of those without, have serology positive for varicella zoster. Age and immune incompetence are the main risk factors. In the current report, we describe an immunocompetent 16 year old girl who presented with pupil involving complete third nerve palsy associated with HZO. After an extensive literature search, we could not find any similar case reported before.

 Case Report



A 16-year-old girl presented to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic with drooping of the left upper eyelid and blurring of vision in the left eye for a week.

She was treated elsewhere for conjunctivitis 2 weeks earlier. However, when she developed a rash on the left side of her face 2 days later, she was diagnosed with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) and started on oral and topical acyclovir (Acivir 400 mg tablets, Cipla Ltd., three times a day and Acivir eye ointment 3% w/w, Cipla Ltd., five times a day). She was currently using acyclovir ointment five times a day and fluorometholone (0.1% w/v, Allergan India Pvt. Ltd.) and moxifloxacin (0.5% w/v, Cipla Ltd.) eye drops four times a day.

On examination, a rash in healing stage was seen on the left side of her face in the distribution of ophthalmic division of trigeminal nerve (V1), reaching up to the tip of her nose. Her right eye was essentially normal. The left eye showed complete ptosis [Figure 1]. On lifting the eyelid manually, visual acuity was recorded to be 6/12 (Snellen) which improved to 6/6 with pinhole. Color vision was normal. The left eye was in exotropic position. The conjunctiva was congested and had papillary reaction (secondary to use of topical acyclovir). Corneal sensations were absent, and cornea showed punctate epithelial erosions (PEEs). Pupil was 8 mm dilated [Figure 2], fixed, not reacting to light (direct, consensual, or near-reflex) with no relative afferent papillary defect. Extraocular examination [Figure 3] revealed limitation of elevation (−5), depression (−4), and adduction (−4); abduction and intorsion were present. Facial sensations were normal and equal on both sides. Fundus examination did not reveal any abnormality.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3}

A provisional diagnosis of the pupil involving complete third nerve palsy secondary to herpes zoster (HZ) was made. Magnetic resonance angiography was advised to rule out compressive lesions. Complete blood count, sugar profile, and tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B surface antigen were advised and were reported to be normal. In view of its typical clinical picture and financial constraints, polymerase chain reaction test or serological tests were not advised. Neuroimaging did not reveal any compressive lesion but showed signs of inflammation around left oculomotor nerve. In consultation with the pediatric neurologist, option of oral steroids under cover of antiviral was advised (prednisolone tablet 1 mg/kg/day, tapering by 10 mg/week, along with acyclovir tablet 400 mg three times a day).

The patient was lost to follow-up for 8 months. On review, we noted that she had taken oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day (Wysolone, Pfizer Ltd., 40 mg tapered over 4 weeks) under cover of oral acyclovir (Acivir 400 mg tablets, Cipla Ltd., three times a day). Now, the ptosis had partially improved (MRD1 of 2 mm). Cornea still showed diffuse PEEs with epithelial haze. The pupil was mid-dilated (4 mm). The eyes were central on Hirschberg. Extraocular movements were full, except elevation that showed −2 limitation. Cover test was orthophoric in primary and reading positions. Worth 4 dot test did not reveal diplopia or suppression of the left eye. A short course of low potent topical steroids and copious lubrication was advised for corneal involvement.

 Discussion



HZ is a common disease affecting elderly patients due to reduction in the level of T-cell immunity to varicella-zoster virus, following initial infection and senescence.[1] HZ occurs by reactivation of latent virus in the ganglions following primary infection with varicella-zoster and occurs mostly in thoracic and cranial sensory ganglia.[2],[3] In addition to sensory neurons, HZ may also affect motor neurons in rare cases.[4] When the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve is affected, the condition is referred to as HZO which occurs in 10%–25% of HZ, with 50% of these cases infecting the eye.[2],[3]

Although not uncommon in adults, HZ is rarely found in children, having an incidence of 42:100,000 person-years.[5] HZO may cause extraocular muscle palsies of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves in 11%–29% of patients.[2] The third nerve is the most common site among them and the fourth the least.[2],[3],[4] Complete ophthalmoplegia is a very rare complication of HZO; only few cases have been reported in the literature.[6],[7]

The extraocular muscle palsies usually appear 2–4 weeks after the rash but sometimes occur simultaneously with the rash or more than 4 weeks later.[4] Involvement of the tip of the nose (Hutchinson sign) is a strong predictor of ocular involvement. Our patient developed palsy 2 weeks after the rash that involved the tip of her nose.

The girl, in this case, did not have an underlying systemic disease, had not been vaccinated against chickenpox, and did not have a history of a priori chickenpox infection. Yet, she presented with an HZO, suggesting that sometimes she may have contracted a (mild or subclinical form of) varicella-zoster infection. Similar cases of HZO in immunocompetent children without a history of varicella vaccination have also been reported in the literature.[8],[9] Likewise, studies of zoster in pediatric patients demonstrate that childhood zoster is not always a harbinger of an underlying immunodeficiency, HIV infection, or malignancy.[5] HZO-related ophthalmoplegia in otherwise healthy pediatric patients has been only been reported as single isolated case of the sixth nerve palsy in contralateral eye [9] and trochlear nerve palsy.[10]

The prognosis of ophthalmoplegia is generally favorable. The duration of diplopia associated with ocular motor palsy was reported to be 2–23 months. However, 87.5% of diplopia cases recovered within 1 year.[2] Our patient though lost to routine follow-up was orthophoric in primary position when reviewed after 8 months. Ptosis, however, was only partially improved.

 Conclusion



The case described here may be the first to report a complete oculomotor nerve ophthalmoplegia with pupil involvement secondary to HZO in a pediatric age group. It has a favorable outcome, and antiviral agents and corticosteroids may be used to hasten the recovery process.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

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