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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 127-131

Pattern of uveitis in a tertiary eye care center in Western India


1 Department of Opthalmology, Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital and Research Center, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Research, Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital and Research Center, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Aratee C Palsule
Department of Opthalmology, Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital and Research Center, Erandwane, Pune - 411 004, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcor.jcor_40_16

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Context: Uveitis is potentially sight-threatening disease. The age-sex adjusted prevalence of uveitis in India is 0.73%. Few studies from South and North India have reported the pattern of uveitis but none from Western India. Aim: The aim of the study was to report the pattern of uveitis in Western India and compare the findings with those seen in other studies from various parts of India and abroad. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective study. Subjects and Methods: The diagnosis of uveitis and the associated systemic diseases was based on a detailed clinical history, ophthalmological, general physical examination, and laboratory tests. Anatomical location of the inflammation was assigned based on the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature criteria. Results: One hundred and ninety-eight patients were included in the study. Nearly 55.6% were female; mean age at presentation was 39.70 ± 14.06 years. Anterior uveitis was the most common variant (n = 82 [41.4%]), followed by panuveitis (n = 42 [21.2%]), posterior (n = 41 [20.7%]), and intermediate uveitis (n = 33 [16.7%]). Out of 198 patients, 98 (49.5%) were idiopathic and 100 (50.5%) patients with specific etiology. Fifty-five patients were diagnosed to have infectious etiology and 45 were noninfectious. Presumed ocular tuberculosis was leading cause for infectious etiology seen in 29 (52.73%) patients. Among the noninfectious patients, human leukocyte antigen B-27 (HLA B-27)-associated uveitis was the most common cause seen in 24 (53.33%) patients. Conclusions: Pattern of uveitis is not entirely same in different geographic areas. HLA B-27-associated uveitis was the most common noninfectious entity, and presumed ocular tuberculosis was leading cause for infectious entities in Western India.


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